• The Brigati Family

    Our great-grandparents came to New York and settled on Long Island in 1876. They purchased land, planted vegetables, and began raising a family.

  • Rise of the Potato

    By the early 20th century, potatoes had become Long Island’s most important cash crop. Our family increased potato production on the farm to keep up with the growing demand. In 1910, farmers in Suffolk County harvested at least 2,500,000 bushels of potatoes. And that was just the start…

  • Struggle and Perseverance

    The Depression changed the face of agriculture. Prices dropped, harvest production slowed, and many farmers went bankrupt. But the Brigati family persevered. We grew and raised all our own food and helped neighbors who were also struggling in the tough economic climate.

  • A Vegetable Boom

    The end of the Depression marked a new beginning for farming across the country. While the potato was still king, Long Island farms started to focus on other vegetable crops, including tomatoes, cabbage, celery, and onions. The Brigati family was especially eager to expand.

  • Expansion & Distribution

    Greater vegetable yields on the farm inevitably led to grocery store distribution in 1953. Our trucks could be spotted making the rounds throughout Long Island, and the Brigati Farm quickly became a produce favorite in towns beyond our native Huntington.

  • Grown Locally

    Although neighbors could always count on our family to help meet their produce needs, it was not until 1964 that we formally set up a farm stand. People near and far now had a place they could depend on for fresh, locally grown vegetables.

  • A Budding Future

    Our father, Ron Brigati, envisioned a new potential market for our farm in the mid ‘60s. He wanted to grow plants and flowers from seeds and make them available to our customers for purchase. After perfecting our methods, we became the first farm on Long Island to grow and sell annuals.

  • A Name is Born

    Customers were eager to spread the word about us, but they only had our surname to go by. So in 1971, we became White Post Farms, a name inspired by the white posts that stood as markers at the farm’s entrance.

  • Getting Involved

    We launched our first plant fundraiser in 1974 to support local schools and charities. Our efforts continue to grow, and today we are proud to partner with organizations across Long Island for our annual fundraisers.

  • Nona’s Pies & Breads

    In the early ‘80s, our grandmother, Nona, began baking and selling pies and breads in small batches at our farm stand. Her work inspired our first pie fundraiser in 1994 to help schools and local organizations with underfunded programs.

  • The Fourth Generation

    When we were kids, we frequently helped our father with the farm’s daily tasks and responsibilities. The older we got, the more responsibility we took on, and by the late ‘80s, we had taken on active roles in managing the family business.

  • The Animal Farm

    The arrival of Billy the Goat marked the opening of our beloved animal farm in 1989. Many of today’s goats can proudly trace their lineage back to Billy! A year-round destination for Long Island families, our animal farm today includes birds, llamas, monkeys, and even kangaroos!

  • The First Fall Farm Festival

    In 1991, White Post Farms held the first fall farm festival of its kind on Long Island. We offered pumpkin picking, pony rides, face painting, fresh apple cider, and family entertainment. The tradition has continued and grown ever since.

  • Party Animals

    With so many parents always asking, it was only a matter of time before we started hosting birthday parties! We now celebrate birthdays for children of all ages, giving them and their families an opportunity to experience the farm in a unique and memorable way.

  • Our Own Breads

    Inspired by our Nona’s work, we began making and distributing our own gourmet breads, along with pies and pound cakes, in 2002. Original recipes and unique flavor combinations continue to be our trademark. Today we are proud to boast over 30 varieties and counting!

  • Looking Ahead

    As passionate about our work as our great-grandparents were in 1876, we are always looking for ways to build upon our foundation and expand our community. Our annual events continue to grow, our fundraising efforts only strengthen, and our gourmet breads are now available nationwide. Times may have changed, but here at White Post Farms, our commitment to quality, service, and tradition has never wavered.


White Post Farms has been a Brigati family tradition on Long Island for more than a century.

It began in 1876, when our great-grandparents came to New York and settled on Long Island. They purchased land, built their home, and began planting vegetables, including potatoes, cabbage, tomatoes, and celery. There were horses to pull plows, chickens, and pigs, too. The townspeople knew us well. Our great grandfather’s brothers were busy stonemasons, and our great grandmother hosted masses in the main house, a tradition that eventually led to the creation of the present-day St. Hughes Church in Huntington. The days were long and the work was often hard, but that was to be expected for a small farm with lofty ambitions and a family committed to producing only the best for the people of their community.

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By the 1920s, potatoes had become Long Island’s most important cash crop, and our family increased potato production on the farm to keep up with the growing demand. When the Depression hit, prices dropped and harvest production slowed, but we persevered. We grew and raised all our own food and helped neighbors who were also struggling in the tough economic climate.

The end of the Depression marked a new beginning for farming across the country. While the potato was still king, our family started focusing on other vegetable crops, including tomatoes, cabbage, celery, and onions. Greater vegetable yields on the farm inevitably led to grocery store distribution in the ‘50s. And eventually, the demand for our produce led to the creation of a farm stand, where people knew to come for fresh, locally grown vegetables. It was around this time that our father, Ron Brigati, began growing plants and flowers from seeds and selling them to customers, effectively making us the first farm on Long Island to sell annuals.

The name “White Post Farms” was our grandfather’s idea in 1971. Our farm stand had become extremely popular, and customers were eager to spread the word. We needed a name for the farm that was more than our surname but just as distinct and very much our own. So our grandfather got to thinking. That night, just like he did every night, he rolled out a snow fence to protect our pumpkins and mums and hung it, like always, from the white posts we had set up out front. Clearly visible from the street, these posts signaled to travelers that they had arrived at our farm. Upon realizing this, our grandfather knew he had found the spark he was looking for, and with that, we became White Post Farms.

Each Brigati generation has left its mark, expanding in some way, spearheading new projects, and contributing to the farm’s impact on the greater community. White Post Farm’s annual fundraising efforts continue to grow, and today we are proud to partner with organizations and schools across Long Island. Our Fall Farm Festival, the first of its kind, has become the premier event of the fall season, and our animal farm, a year-round destination for families, boasts the friendliest, most exotic creatures, including goats, birds, llamas, monkeys, and even kangaroos! And just this past year, we began distributing our signature breads, pies, and pound cakes nationwide via our new ecommerce site!

From a humble vegetable farm to a veritable staple on Long Island, White Post Farms has grown and continues to evolve. We are always looking for ways to build upon our foundation and finding new ways to give back to the community. Times may have changed, but here at White Post Farms, our commitment to quality, service, and tradition has never wavered.